Talks to Academic Audiences

“Brutal kings who respected laws: similarities between the effects of two conquests on English law.”  Paper delivered at the Conquest: 1016-1066 conference held in Oxford, 21-24 July 2016.

“English medieval translators and their cultures: a thick description.”  Invited paper for conference entitled Narratives about Translations, convened by José Luis Mancha (Universidad de Sevilla), and Sonja Brentjes (MPIWG), at the Max Planck Institut für Wissenschaftgeschichte, Berlin, November 16-20, 2015.

“The end of a dilemma: digital editions and the choice between authorial and received texts.”  Invited talk for conference entitled Law and Governance, held at Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, October 23-24, 2015.

“Why translate laws in the Middle Ages: access, authority, or authenticity?”  Keynote for conference Law and Language in the Middle Ages, Royal Academy for Science and Letters, Copenhagen, Denmark, September 10-11, 2015.

“Written languages, translation, and ethnicity in the aftermath of the Norman conquest.”  Presented as part of the Spring lecture series at the Center for Medieval Studies, Fordham University, March 24, 2015.

“How English law was written.” Plenary talk, invited, delivered at the Haskins Society Annual Conference, November 6–9, 2014.

“Hearing and seeing, remembering and writing: From Memory to Written Record across the Norman conquest,” invited paper given at ‘A Colloquium to Mark the Publication of the 3rd Edition of From Memory to Written Record, by Michael Clanchy.’ King’s College London, Weston Room, Maughan Library, Chancery Lane, London, Tuesday 14 May 2013.

“Digitizing Early English Laws.”  A presentation at a conference on new work in  medieval English law, hosted by the Department of History, University of Western Ontario, 14–15 October 2011.

“Legal evolution and revolution in twelfth-century England.”  A plenary talk delivered at a conference entitled Early Medieval Law in Context, organized by the Early English Laws project, and hosted by the Carlsberg Academy in Copenhagen, Denmark, 15–16 September 2011.

“Anglo-Saxon law-makers and their laws in the twelfth century.”  Presented at a conference, The Long Twelfth-Century View of the Anglo-Saxon Past, held at Robinson College Cambridge, 29–30 March 2011.

Instituta Cnuti in Textus Roffensis: The late-eleventh and early-twelfth-century context.” Presented at a conference, Textus Roffensis: Law, Language and Libraries in Early Medieval England, held at the University of Kent, 25–27 July 2010.

“How English Law Has Been Written: Composition Technique, Language, and the Impact of Conquest, c. 1000–c. 1200.”  Presented at the universities of London, Reading, Wales (Cardiff and Bangor), and St. Andrews, October 2008–April 2009.

“The Creation and Mutation of Legal Texts in England before 1200.”  Presented at the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, Vancouver, British Columbia, April 2008.

“Englishness Reconsidered.”  Presented at the Earlier Middle Ages seminar at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, October 2006.

“Language Contact in Conquered England.”  Presented at a conference entitled ‘Rethinking Medieval Multilingualism’, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, July 2006.

“Mapping Languages in Medieval England.”  Presented at the 41st International Congress of Medeival Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 2006.

“The Norman Conquest of Virginia.”  Presented at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, England, July 15 2004.

“R. W. Southern, John Boswell, and Anselm.” Presented at the 39th International Congress of Medeival Studies, Kalamazoo, 8 May 2004.

“The Translation of Law and the Culture of Translation in Anglo-Norman England.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America in Seattle, WA, 3 April 2004.

“The Instituta Cnuti and the Translation of English Law.” A paper presented at the 25th Annual Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies in Glasgow, Scotland, on 30 July 2002.

“Language Communities and Concepts in Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Norman, and Angevin England.” A paper presented at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 3 May 2002.

“Forgers of Law and their Readers: the Crafting of Political Identities in Postconquest England.”  Invited paper given as part of the Medieval Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh, 22 February 2002.

“Justice Reduced.”  A paper given at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, MI, on 5 May 2001.

“Conquering Babel: Translation in Medieval England.” Invited talk given at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York (on 20 March 2000) and at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London, 22 March 2000.

“A Common Law Mentality in Anglo-Saxon England (c. 1000)?” Invited talk given at the conference ‘Expectations of the Law,’ at the University of Exeter, England (24 March 2000), and at the annual meeting of the American Society for Legal History, Princeton University, 20 October 2000.

“The First Book, Start to Finish.”  A paper presented in a session entitled “Getting Published: Advice from Editors and Insiders,” with Richard Emerson, editor of Speculum, and Bill Harnum, editor for the University of Toronto Press, at the International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, 5 May 2000.

“Language and Ethnicity in Medieval England.”  Invited talk given at SUNY Stoneybrook, sponsored by the History Department, in February 2000.

“‘Disgraceful to be called English’:  Thoughts on Finding Ethnicity in Conquest England.”  A paper presented at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 1999.

“Who Wrote the Leges Edwardi Confessoris?”  An invited paper presented at Boston College, 16 April 1998.

“Translating the Law from Alfred to the Angevins,” at the annual meeting of the Charles Homer Haskins Society, Cornell University, November 1998.

“The Murder Fine in Postconquest England.”  An invited faculty workshop presentation at the School of Law, Washington and Lee University, Lynchburg, VA, 9 February 1998.

“Local Custom and its Enforcement in Twelfth-Century England.”  A paper presented at the annual meeting of the Charles Homer Haskins Society, Houston, TX, 9 November 1997.

“The Becket Conflict and the Invention of the Myth of Lex non scripta.” An invited paper delivered to the Seminar on Law and History, Oxford University, 22 February 1996, and then revised and presented at the 13th British Legal History Conference, ‘Learning the Law,’ at Cambridge University, July 1997.

“The Origin of a Legal Literature of Complaint in England.”  A paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, New York, January 1997.

Talks to Audiences Outside Academia

“Conquest, Wars and Liberties of the Realm: the Long Run-Up to Magna Carta.”  Houston Museum of Natural Science,  March 12, 2014. 

“Before Magna Carta” Invited presentation in a program on Magna Carta for the Giles Rich Inn of Court, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, November 18, 2014.

“Forgers, Scribes, and Ghost-Writers: Producing Early English Law,” in the speaker series at Covington and Burling, a Washington DC law firm, 13 December 2010.

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